Dr. Drakos in the NewsOrthopaedic Surgery

Scientific Projects & Media:

  • Are There Risks to Playing Soccer on Infilled Artificial Turf?

    Although lower leg injuries can occur in all athletes, there is evidence that deep cleats, such as those used by soccer players, may dramatically increased the likelihood of severe non-contact injuries such as ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) tears of the knee.
  • Cadaver Legs Give New Insights Into Athletes’ Ligament Tears.

    Source: www.wired.com
    Posted on 30/11/2010
    Knee ligament injuries can strike at any time and be utterly devastating to an athlete's career. A former Harvard wide receiver–turned–orthopedic surgeon is dedicated to finding new ways to prevent such an ailment from dashing players' dreams of professional stardom, but it's the methods in his Long Island lab that might give Mark Drakos a leg up on his fellow academics.
  • Ankle Sprains: Common Injury Can Cause Persistent Symptoms

    Source: www.northshorelij.com
    posted on 02/03/2011
  • Win the Sprain Game. Stephen Fried. Men’s Health.

    Source: www.menshealth.com
    Posted on 8/11/2010
    Consulted as medical expert.
  • Less ACL Strain Found with Natural Grass Shoe-Surface Combination. Mark Drakos, MD.

    • Reduced ACL Injury With Cleat/Natural Grass Combination

      Source: www.medicalnewstoday.com
      Posted on 1/21/10
      Athletes put less strain on their anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) while making a cut on a natural grass surface while wearing a cleat.
    • Less ACL strain found with cleat and natural grass shoe-surface combination

      Source: www.healio.com
      January 21, 2010
      A recent study by investigators from Hospital for Special Surgery shows that athletes making a cut on natural grass while wearing cleats may put less strain on their ACL.
    • Soccer injuries: Cleat-natural grass combination may be less likely to result in anterior cruciate ligament injury

      Source: www.sciencedaily.com
      January 23, 2010
      Athletes put less strain on their anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) while making a cut on a natural grass surface while wearing a cleat. This is the conclusion from a study that tested the strain placed on the ACL of four different shoe-surface interactions: Astroturf/turf shoe, modern playing turf/turf shoe, modern turf/cleat, and natural grass/cleat.
  • Cowboys Cast Wary Eye at the Alamodome Turf. Tom Osborn. Express-News

    Source: www.mysanantonio.com
    posted 07/27/09
    Consulted as medical expert
  • Hamsting Injuries. Patrick Birmingham, MD, Mark Drakos, MD.

    Source: www.hss.edu
    Posted on 2/12/09
    The hamstrings are a group of three muscles located in the back of the thigh. They are the most common muscles injured in professional football and usually occur during the “push-off” phase of running.
  • Artificial Turf: Does it Increase the Risk of Sports Injuries? An exploration of the effectiveness of cleats on artificial turf. Mark Drakos, MD.

    Source: www.hss.edu
    Posted on 8/21/08
    An exploration of the effectiveness of cleats on artificial turf, Artificial turf has been in use for over 40 years. The initial premise was to use nylon and other synthetic materials to create a surface which was simple to maintain and could be used for indoor stadiums. History has shown us that this noble goal is quite a challenge and a frequent subject of controversy.
  • Discoid Meniscus, Iliotibial Band Syndrome. Answorth A. Allen, MD; Mark C. Drakos, BA. Pocket Sports Medicine. Software for PDA (Palm) Devices. Edited by David Drez, MD; Bernard Bach, MD.

    Source: www.pocketmedicine.com
    Posted on 2/12/09